HESCA News

Updated on 15th November 2019

Investors eye up York student's mobile payment app
Yorkpress
An entrepreneurial teenager is in talks with retailers and investors after launching a mobile payment app. Yoyo Chang is a second year Management School student at the University of York whose app is set to be trialled across Nisa stores located on campus. The 19-year old has helped develop KodyPay which is a mobile payment application that allows users to pay for goods via their mobile phone, making it a quick and easy process.

French privacy regulator finds facial recognition gates in schools illegal
BiometricUpdate
The intention to use facial recognition integrated in biometric gates at two high schools in France was heavily criticized and opposed by digital rights groups, parents and teachers’ unions, writes Politico, which led to the country’s data protection watchdog CNIL ruling that the initiative is illegal and breaches privacy laws.
(When will they realise that Privacy is a dead concept? Ed.)

This mobile device is changing the way schools are fundraising
Technical.ly DC
... donations by swiping a credit card, inserting an EMV chip card or using a mobile wallet such as Apple Pay at fundraisers and alumni events.

Cambridge university AI speech start-up in fundraising
The Sunday Telegraph
A Cambridge start-up developing speech recognition technology for blue-chip firms has raised more than £7m to expand globally and challenge Amazon and Google’s voice assistants.

Sectigo partners with SPYRUS to help universities and enterprises protect against ransomware ...
Help Net Security
Device identity, authentication, and access management are critical to ransomware prevention. The SPYRUS Rosetta Hardware “Root of Trust” ...

University of Bristol joins international network to drive civic innovation
University of Bristol
The University and the City of Bristol have a strong track record in collaborating on civic smart technology projects, including world-first initiatives in ...

Schools ordered to discontinue fingerprint scanning
Jamaica Gleaner
School administrators have been directed by the Ministry of Education to discontinue the practice of scanning fingerprints to record attendance until ...
(More madness from ignorant civil servants: Ed.)

Top three things to consider when selecting campus credentials
CR80News
From mechanical keys to mobile devices, managing access is an essential piece of campus security. With more campuses exploring mobile credentials, buzz continues to build across the campus card industry. In response, schools are reevaluating their credential platforms alongside locks and other hardware to provide a more secure and convenient campus experience.

Duo authentication secures angry student backlash
The Bucknellian
Many joined in, carrying their signs, phones and computers to display their hate for the newer, safer and more tedious authentication tool, while some ...

Video: WaveLynx touts open, interoperable campus card system
CR80News
Wavelynx’s Jacob Jablonski talks about the LEAF protocol and how universities can use the open architecture approach to forge a vendor agnostic campus card system. A newcomer to the campus card space, Wavelynx Technologies is championing a different approach to structuring a university card transaction system by promoting an open infrastructure with the freedom to mix and match solutions.

Facial recognition in school given Sweden’s first GDPR fine
Planet Biometrics
The Swedish DPA has fined a municipality 200 000 SEK (approximately 20 000 euros) for using facial recognition technology to monitor the attendance of students in school.
(More daft court action: Ed.)

Swedish school board fined for using facial recognition to take class register
Telecompaper
The Swedish Data Inspection Authority said it has imposed its first penalty for breach of GDPR, to a school in Skelleftea that had been trialling facial recognition to register pupil attendance. The authority scrutinised the three-week pilot 22 pupils and found that the school board's handling of personal information did not comply with GDPR. The fine amounts to SEK 200,000.
(What madness is this? Ed.)